Fun facts for kids about a F1 car

Whether they have a parent who is an F1 enthusiast or they’re simply interested in science and engineering, F1 cars provide a fascinating world of fun facts for kids. Let’s take a look at a few.

F1

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Aerodynamics

Probably some of the most fascinating facts about F1 cars come from their aerodynamics. Getting the aerodynamics of an F1 car right is important for two reasons. First, they reduce the drag, or air resistance, which can slow a car down. Second, they create downforce that helps the car to hold the track better, improving how the car handles and corners. Someone who is involved with the design and development of the aerodynamics of a car is called an aerodynamicist.

G-Force

Where it is safe to do so, F1 cars are driven at speeds in excess of 200 miles an hour, only slowing down for corners and chicanes. Such high speeds mean that drivers experience a g-force of up to 5G when they brake for corners.

F1 car

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Safety

With cars traveling at such great speeds, safety is a critical concern, and an F1 driver’s helmet is amongst the strongest and toughest things in the world. A driver’s overalls are made up of four layers of flame-retardant and flame-resistant materials to protect them against fire should they be involved in a crash.

If you’re looking for ideas to get your child more involved in F1, Wired offers some great tips about how to get your child started with F1 from an early age.

Where to watch an F1 race

If your child is seriously into F1, simply learning facts might not be enough. You might want to let them experience watching a race live. While there are lots of opportunities to watch races on TV or online, there can be no better experience than being there in person. One of the most iconic and historic circuits is Monaco, and Edge Global Events can arrange the F1 Paddock Club in Monaco. The F1 Paddock Club Monaco offers a VIP experience, and some packages include access to the pits and the drivers.

Whether your child is more interested in aerodynamics than the actual races themselves or they really are developing into a speed freak, there are plenty of ways that they can engage with F1.